High earners reveal how they really spend their money


The cost of living crisis is hitting many families hard, but high-income people who are still able to afford luxuries have revealed that they spend their money every month.

In a revealing thread on the Mumsnet parenting website, a 27-year-old unnamed woman living outside London for an hour explained that she and her 29-year-old medical husband earn just under £ 140,000 a year together.

His post titled, “High Salaries: How Do You Spend Your Salary?” he explained that they contribute with their pensions and allocate 10 percent per month of their earnings to charities, but they wanted to know if they could better allocate their income.

Other respondents listed expenses such as private school fees and children, trips to the opera, and hiring homework help.

A Mumsnet user (not pictured) sparked a debate after asking his high-income colleagues how they spend their disposable income

The poster revealed that they invest £ 1,000 a month and also set aside £ 1,000 for holidays, as well as general savings.

The poster revealed that they invest £ 1,000 a month and also set aside £ 1,000 for holidays, as well as general savings.

In a revealing thread on the Mumsnet parenting website, a 27-year-old unnamed woman living outside London for an hour explained that she and her 29-year-old medical husband earn just under £ 140,000 a year together.

In a revealing thread on the Mumsnet parenting website, a 27-year-old unnamed woman living outside London for an hour explained that she and her 29-year-old medical husband earn just under £ 140,000 a year together.

Another said she was helping each of her five children buy their first property, while one said her money was for investments, cared for by her husband, a banker.

Expensive food, exercise classes and taxis were on the list as well as travel, although one admitted that holidays are considered “a chore” and she prefers to spend money on home decorating.

Starting the thread, the woman said she wanted to “ask other high-income households how they usually spend their money?” to ‘see if we could be using it better or if this is more suitable for comparables’.

She explained: “We plan to start paying off the mortgage in excess. We invest £ 1,000 a month (hence £ 500 each) and save £ 1,000 on holiday.

High-income people have revealed that they spend money on luxuries, including holidays, home help and opera.

High-income people have revealed that they spend money on luxuries, including holidays, home help and opera.

Other respondents listed expenses such as private and school fees, trips to the opera, and hiring homework help.

Other respondents listed expenses such as private and school fees, trips to the opera, and hiring homework help.

“Of course we make general / specific savings, but then there’s a lot left over for disposable income.”

One revealed: “The combined gross salary is £ 220,000. It goes with big pension quotas, children’s school fees, savings and investments, holidays, we have people for dinner quite often, eating out, a mortgage.

A second wrote: ‘Apart from the opera, there is not much. Everything is paid for and the children are older. Oh wait, half the son’s next wedding.

“Still both working full time because we like to work. There’s nothing we need or want especially, so the money is just reinvested.

Another list simply: “Help at home, holidays and activities / classes”.

Many users thought that talking about financial matters could be useful as well as interesting, and argued the question of the poster

Many users thought that talking about financial matters could be useful as well as interesting, and argued the question of the poster

However, the post also received some negative comments, and some commentators called it insensitive, especially given the current cost of living crisis.

A poster read: “What a boastful and rather insensitive thread given the current financial situation that many people face. Why don’t you go and pay a financial advisor to tell you what to do with your bloated salary instead of bragging about Mumsnet ?

Another agreed, adding: ‘Good pity. What a nasty thread. At least there are no comments on the “return” and charitable donations. Then he could vomit.

However, others have insisted that there is nothing wrong with questioning how other people spend their money.

Another forum user added: “Making taboo talking about winning well is not helpful. I earn well and I often think I should be grateful (and I am) and be satisfied with it, something that many posters here would no doubt agree with.

“Well, I read a paycheck here recently and it gave me the confidence to ask for the raise I suspected I owed for a while. Not because the posters there were in my situation, but because I saw that there are a lot of women with a lot “Good salaries. You don’t have to settle for ‘good enough’ because it’s greedy to have more.”

And a third added: “It may not be detailed financial advice, but op is clearly trying to understand the ways in which people like her distribute their profits in different things.

‘Are other people prioritizing pensions or mortgages? And the fun stuff? How much does someone spend and save on their salary? It’s not something that’s talked about openly, and we’re all curious about how we compare ourselves to others. ”

The post has been criticized by some posters, who have suggested it was insensitive, given that many people are currently struggling with the cost of living crisis.

The post has been criticized by some posters, who have suggested it was insensitive, given that many people are currently struggling with the cost of living crisis.



Source link

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.